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Vegetable Garden in August: Sowing, Planting, and Harvesting

Which vegetables to sow in the vegetable garden in August?

  • Curly chicories and escaroles (early August)
  • Spinach
  • Fennel (early August)
  • Kidney beans with fillets, mangetout
  • Autumn lettuce
  • Winter lettuce
  • Lettuce to cut
  • Mâches
  • Fall turnips
  • White onions
  • Radish
  • Black radish

Vegetables to plant or transplant in August

  • Curly chicories or escaroles
  • Cauliflower
  • Broccoli
  • Fennel
  • Autumn lettuce
  • Lettuce to cut

Which vegetables to harvest in August?

vegetable garden in august
Photo by Taryn Elliott from Pexels
  • Aubergines
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Celeriac
  • Celery
  • Curly chicories or escaroles
  • Cabbage (head, Milan, red)
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumbers
  • Courgettes
  • Fennel
  • Kidney beans with fillets, mangetout
  • Beans with reams and nets, mangetout
  • Shelling beans (fresh grains)
  • Summer lettuce
  • Lettuce to cut
  • Melons
  • Yellow or red onions
  • Sorrel
  • Parsnip
  • Summer leeks
  • Pears
  • Wrinkled peas and mangetout
  • Radish
  • Tetragons
  • Tomatoes
  • Sow green manure

When some crops are finished, consider sowing green manure before the next sowing. These plants like clover or mustard have the ability to capture nutrients and restore them to the soil. The earth is thus richer, microbial life develops and its structure is improved. They occupy your unoccupied plots for a season and then are mown just before flowering. The stems are then used as mulch or are added to compost.

Maintenance of the vegetable garden in August

August is a month when harvests are abundant. Plants need a little attention to ensure good production.

Hoe and mulch

Hoeing involves breaking the surface crust of the soil to improve water infiltration. This technique is also useful for removing weeds. Armed with a hoe, you can then move back and forth between your rows of vegetables. Once the hoeing is complete, spread a layer of mulch to keep the soil cool.

Watering

It must be frequent to compensate for the strong summer heat. Prefer watering in the evening, so that the plant benefits from the humidity throughout the night. If you are going on vacation, consider using automatic watering, or asking a neighbor to pass by.

Cut

Some plants benefit from being pruned to maximize production. This is the case with tomatoes, eggplants, melons, cucumbers, and squash. Also, remember to guide them to their tutor for those who need it.

Ventilation of frames and tunnels

With the blazing sun, remember to raise the tarpaulins of your tunnels and open the frames. This will prevent your plants from suffering from heat during the day. You can then close them at the end of the day to keep a good temperature for the night.

Collect your seeds for next year

If you have planted reproducible varieties, consider collecting the seeds for next year! Depending on each plant, the seeds are located in different places. For cucurbits and nightshades, they are found in the fruit. We recover the seeds of tomatoes, cucumbers, eggplants, squash. The Apiaceous (fennel, celery, carrot, dill…) are located in the flowers during the rise in the seed. This corresponds to the end of flowering when the seeds are growing rapidly. Fabaceae (beans, peas, beans …) as for them, contain their seeds in their pods. For potatoes, these are the tubers that are replanted the following year after having made them germinate. Don’t forget to keep a few!

The vegetable garden in September: sowing, maintenance, and harvests

In the vegetable garden in September, the gardener benefits from well-deserved harvests. A little maintenance and a few seedlings punctuate this calm period.

vegetable garden in august
Photo by Anna Shvets from Pexels

September is a rather calm time for seedlings. Spring sowing still offers harvests, and summer sowing has already been done. Here are some vegetables to sow in September for harvests at the end of the year or the following year.

Spinach September vegetable sowing

  • Winter lettuce
  • Lettuce to cut
  • Mâches
  • Fall turnips
  • White onions
  • Chervil
  • Parsley
  • Harriette

What crops are in the vegetable garden in September?

crops in august
Photo by Sorapong Chaipanya from Pexels

The list goes on depending on the plants you choose to grow this year. Some spring seedlings like tomatoes still produce generously. At the same time, the first harvests of summer seedlings appear, like lamb’s lettuce.

September vegetable harvest

  • Aubergines
  • Beets
  • Carrots
  • Celeriac
  • Celery
  • Curly chicories and escaroles
  • Cabbage (cabus, Milan, red)
  • Cauliflower
  • Cucumbers
  • Pickles
  • Courgettes
  • Fennel
  • Kidney beans with fillets, mangetout
  • Beans with reams and nets, mangetout
  • Shelling beans (fresh or dried beans)
  • Summer lettuce
  • Autumn lettuce
  • Lettuce to cut
  • Mâches
  • Melons
  • Fall turnips
  • Red and yellow onions
  • Sorrel
  • Parsnip
  • Summer leeks
  • Pears
  • Wrinkled peas and mangetout
  • Pumpkins
  • Radish
  • Tetragon
  • Tomatoes

Maintain the vegetable garden

gardening in august
Photo by Makara Eam from Pexels

Weed and hoe

Do not forget to weed your rows of vegetables regularly in order to leave them plenty of room to give you good harvests. You can use a hoe, which will improve water infiltration along the way.

Watering

Depending on the weather, water regularly, taking precipitation into account. Be sure to keep a cool substrate for your crops.

Butter for blanching

Cardoons, curly chicory, celery, and fennel need to be butted regularly. It consists of
gathering the earth at the foot of the plant. Deprived of light, the base remains white,
which allows for tender and tasty harvests.

Ripen melons and tomatoes

If you have a good number of green tomatoes left, do not hesitate to remove some of the highest leaves. Indeed, this will allow the sun to reach the fruits. In addition, the plant will concentrate its sap in the direction of the remaining fruits. Also, be aware that both melons and tomatoes continue to ripen after harvest. If the weather is gloomy, don’t hesitate to pick your unripe fruit. Then place them in your fruit basket, near pears, apples, or bananas. These fruits produce ethylene, a gas that boosts ripening.

Sow green manure

If your vegetable garden is dedicated to spring and summer vegetables, consider green manures for fall and winter. Phacelia, mustard, clover… These plants have the capacity to improve the structure of the soil and enrich it. They capture nutrients to return them to the soil. Microbial life is thus richer, and the soil restructured. You can sow green manure in late summer, early fall once your plots are empty of all crops. Then, you just have to mow them and use them as mulch to cover your plot.

Harvest the seeds

Tomato seed harvest. Consider collecting the seeds for next year! Please note that this is only possible in the case of reproducible varieties. When cutting your tomatoes, zucchini, melons, and all other cucurbits and nightshades collect the seeds inside the fruits. The Apiaceae are located in the flowers; they are recovered during the rise in seeds. The Fabaceae they contain in their pods. Whatever the vegetables, it is important to let them dry well for 2-3 weeks in a ventilated room. Then all you just have to do is put them into envelopes and remember to name and date them.

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